It was the great moment of the emblematic British Philhellene, founder of the Greek Navy, captain of Karteria and national benefactor of Greece, Frank Abney-Hastings.

This naval battle was also one of the greatest moments of Philhellenism. The Greek fleet with Admiral Frank Abney-Hastings, captains of the other ships the Danish-German Fabricius, the British Georges Thomas and the French general Dentzel, and dozens of other philhellenes and Greek sailors, destroyed the entire Turkish fleet in the Gulf of Corinth, opening the road to the liberation of mainland Greece. The African-American Williams also took part in this naval battle, leading a group of 15 sailors to take back control of the Greek ship Savior that had been left unmanned.

SHP and the Philhellenism Museum honor the Philhellenes volunteers who participated in the naval battle of Agali (Itea), displaying in the Museum of Philhellenism the personal pistols of Frank Abney-Hastings, which were used in this naval battle.

You may find the biography of Frank Abney-Hastings here:

 

 

 

 

In 2021, apart from the great anniversary of the 200 years since the beginning of the national liberation struggle of the Greeks, 225 years have passed since the birth of the important philhellene and composer Johan Daniel Elster. This Philhellene survived the catastrophic battle of Peta and is the only eyewitness on what happened there. He described these historical events in detail in his well-known book “The Battalion of the Philhellenes”.

An honorary event will take place on this occasion on September 12, 2021 in the birthplace of Elster in Benshausen, Germany, in which the keynote speaker will be Professor Kostas Papailiou, member of the Advisory Committee of the Society for Hellenism and Philhellenism. In his speech, Mr. Papailiou will refer to the great role of Philhellenism in the National Uprising.

 

 

We present to you the renewed board game from the collection of the Philhellenism Museum It is a game that traces its roots to ancient Greece, and the feats of Theseus, who crosses the galleries of the labyrinth in search of self-knowledge and triumph. This game has been played in Europe since the 16th century. In the 19th century it conquered the Philhellenic circles and the edition of the time symbolizes the liberation struggle of the Greeks in 1821.

The board of the game is a copy of the one Philhellenes used to play in the 19th century.

The pawns of the game are small busts of Lord Byron in 4 colors.

For more information please visit our Art Shop:
https://phmus.org/en/product/the-goose-game/

 

Lord Byron (1788 – 1824)

A restless and creative spirit, inspired by the values of Hellenic culture, in the early 19th century directs literature and intellectual life into new paths. He impresses with his poetic work, identifies with the Romantic Movement, is admired and worshipped internationally. Like Theseus and Odysseus, he sometimes succumbs to his weaknesses and sometimes faces them down, all the while on the look-out for a noble goal that will redeem him. Finally he transforms himself into a political and military being and identifies with the cause of the Greek revolution. His death in Missolonghi in 1824 shocked international public opinion, gave an explosive dimension to the international philhellenic movement, and turned the cause of Greece’s independence into a just vindication for his loss.

 

 

 

A delegation of the Academy of Athens visits the Philhellenism Museum.

The members of the Academy were given a tour of the Museum, were informed about the collections and the archives of the Society for Hellenism and Philhellenism and examined prospects for future cooperation.

The photo shows the Members of the Academ Mr. Michalis Tiverios, Ms. Chryssa Maltezou, Mr. Paschalis Kitromilidis, the Ad H Ambassador Mr. Dimitrios Tsikouris, Mr. Constantinos Velentzas and the executive of the Academy of Athens Ms. Louiza Karapidaki.

Professor Nikos Apostolidis, member of the Advisory Committee of SHP, talks about his important ancestor and his contribution to the Greek Revolution.

 

 

The President of the European Parliament, Mr. David Sassoli, donated a flag of the European Union to the Philhellenism Museum. The flag was handed over to the Museum by Mr. Philippe Kamaris, from the Liaison Office of the European Parliament (EP) in Athens.

Mr. Kamaris was given a tour of the Museum, he saw the exhibits, and was informed about the history of the philhellenic movement, and the important role played by European Philhellenes who fought bravely on the side of the Greeks as volunteers, and by European politicians, artists and intellectuals who supported the philhellenic movement during the Greek war for independence.

The Society for Hellenism and Philhellenism (SHP) recalled that the Philhellenic movement helped Europeans understand their common values ​​and roots. It inspired thousands of young people to support the struggle of the Greeks, and many of them, even former enemies, to fight under the same flag for the same ideals.

These actions and the expression of solidarity with Greece, led to the first common European policy that emerged after the Treaty of London of 1827, and culminated with the Battle of Navarino and the establishment of the Greek state.

SHP also presented to the European Parliament the model of the Philhellenes monument that will be placed in the centre of Athens, on Vasilissis Sofias Street.

During the handover of the flag, Mr. Kamaris shared on behalf of the European Parliament the warm greetings of EP’s President Mr. Sassoli. In the words of the President, 2021 coincides not only with the bicentennial of the Greek revolution, but also with the 40th anniversary of Greece in the EU, fully re-joining the European family – a proof of the in temporal nature of the values of philhellenism.

SHP assured the President of the European Parliament that it will continue, together with the Museum of Philhellenism, to promote with its work the common cultural values ​​of Europe, and the continuous Philhellenism, as a virtue serving the continuous progress of our societies.

 

 

The staff guided the Ambassador to the premises of the Museum and presented to him the exhibits, the history of the philhellenic movement, and the important role played by the many Polish philhellenes who fought bravely on the side of the Greeks as volunteers, as well as journalists, artists and intellectuals who supported the philhellenic movement of their time.

The Society for Hellenism and Philhellenism (SHP) referred to the Philhellene, national poet of Poland, Adam Mickiewicz, to the officer Franciszek Mierzejewski and to the unit of Polish volunteers, who fought bravely in Peta, and sacrificed their lives to support the Greek struggle.

In parallel, SHP presented a commemorative medal depicting the Polish hero of the Greek Revolution Franciszek Mierzejewski.

 

 

Moreover, SHP presented to the Ambassador the model of the Philhellenes monument that will be placed in the centre of Athens.

Ambassador Artur LOMPART delivered to the Museum, on behalf of the Senate, the upper house of the Polish parliament, a flag as a symbol of friendship between the Polish and Greek peoples, and stated the following: “The Greek Revolution and the heroism of its fighters, inspired many enslaved nations, including Poles who lived under foreign rule at that time. We are connected by similar historical experiences and a belief in the ideals of freedom, for which we often had to pay the highest price. This closeness of our peoples is visible also today”.

 

SHP assured the Ambassador that it will continue together with the Museum of Philhellenism, to promote with their work, the common cultural values ​​of Greece and Poland, and the continuous philhellenism as a virtue, to serve the constant progress of our societies.

 

 

 

The winner of the Anglo-Hellenic League Runciman Award 2021 is Roderick Beaton for Greece: Biography of a Modern Nation (London: Allen Lane 2019). In winning the Runciman Award for a fourth time, Prof. Beaton has set a new record of achievement.

Announcing the result of this year’s competition, Prof. Peter Frankopan, the chair of judges, said:

We were lucky enough to read some breath-takingly good books this year – including many that are both brave and ambitious, including re-tellings of stories that are well-known and investigations of real originality about topics rarely, if ever, looked at. Roddy Beaton’s book is a combination of all these qualities. It is not easy to write broad history for wide readership, and to do so well takes real skill. Covering recent centuries of Greece’s history requires courage too, as many have strong opinions about what should be written about – and how. What makes Beaton’s book stand out above all, however, is that just as Sir Steven Runciman’s books opened doors through which new generations of readers and scholars have since walked, so too will Greece: Biography of a Modern Nation. As a jury, we felt that this wonderful book captured the spirit of the Runciman Award perfectly.

John Kittmer, chair of the Council of The Anglo-Hellenic League, said:

 ‘On behalf of the League I warmly congratulate Roddy Beaton for winning this year’s Runciman Award. In its 35-year history Roddy is the only person to have won the award four times: a tremendous achievement. In relaunching the award under new sponsors in this year of the bicentenary of the Greek revolution, we are delighted that the judges have chosen to acknowledge the timely relevance of this great book.

The announcement of the winner of the Anglo-Hellenic League Runciman Award 2021 was made on Thursday 17 June, 7pm at an event held (because of Covid-19 restrictions) by Zoom webinar. Prof. Stathis Kalyvas (University of Oxford) gave the keynote address on ‘Why the Greek Revolution still matters today’. Peter Frankopan surveyed the field of longlisted and shortlisted books on behalf of the panel of judges. The event closed with an acceptance speech by the winner.

The Runciman Award

  1. The Anglo-Hellenic League Runciman Award was conceived in 1983, as an initiative of Earl Jellicoe, the then chairman of the League, in honour of Sir Steven Runciman, the distinguished historian of Byzantium and longest-serving chairman of the League (1951-1967). It was first awarded in 1986 and has been awarded most years since then.
  2. The award is given to the best book (or books) written in English in the previous year on a Greek subject. It aims to stimulate interest in Greek history and culture from earliest times to the present; to reward and encourage good and accessible writing, of which Sir Steven’s works are an example; and to promote a wider knowledge and understanding of Greece’s contribution to civilisation and values. The prize may be awarded for a work in the field of history, literary studies, biography, travel and topography, the arts, architecture, archaeology, the environment, social and political sciences or current affairs; or for a work of fiction, poetry or drama. Translations from Greek literature into English are also eligible.
  3. No award was made in 2020. Books published in 2019 and 2020 were eligible for the award in 2021.
  4. The panel of judges for the award in 2021 comprises: Peter Frankopan (chair), Dionysis Kapsalis, Naoise Mac Sweeney, Judith Mossman and Sofka Zinovieff. The judges announced their long list of 21 titles on 14 January and their short list of 7 titles on 9 April (see www.runcimanaward.org).
  5. Roderick Beaton previously won the award in 1995 for An Introduction to Modern Greek Literature (Oxford: OUP 1994); in 2004 for George Seferis: Waiting for the Angel – A Biography (New Haven: Yale UP 2003); and in 2014 for Byron’s War: Romantic Rebellion, Greek Revolution (Cambridge: CUP 2013).
  6. Enquiries about the Runciman Award can be made to the acting award administrator (Dr John Kittmer) at info@anglohellenicleague.org. Information about the two sponsoring foundations can be found at: https://www.aclcf.org/about-en/the-foundation/and http://www.leventisfoundation.org/en/. The announcement to publishers for the Anglo-Hellenic League Runciman Award 2022 will be made in late October 2021.

 

 

Ms. Maria-Zoe Lafi, Executive Director of the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C., Harvard University, along with Mr. Christos Giannopoulos, Managing Director, and Mr. Evangelos Katsarelis, Programs & Events Manager, of the Center for Hellenic Studies in Greece visited the Philhellenism Museum.

They were given a tour of the Museum, were informed about the archives of the Society’s for Hellenism and Philhellenism, and discussed prospects for future cooperation and joint actions in Greece and the USA.

 

 

 

The staff guided the Ambassador to the premises of the Museum and presented to her the exhibits, the history of the philhellenic movement, and the important role played by the many Irish philhellenes who fought bravely on the side of the Greeks as volunteers or supported the action of the philhellenic committees of the time.

The Society for Hellenism and Philhellenism (SHP) referred to the national poet of Ireland Thomas Moore, close friend of Lord Byron and one of the founding and particularly active members of the emblematic Philhellenic Committee of London.

In parallel, SHP presented paintings and personal objects of many important Irish Philhellenes, like Edward Blaquiere, Richard Church, Sir James Emerson Tennent, etc.

SHP presented to the Ambassador the model of the Philhellenes monument that will be placed in the center of Athens.

Ambassador Iseult Fitzgerald expressed her gratitude for the tour of the museum, and welcomed the recognition given to the contribution of Irishmen as Thomas Moore and Richard Church to the cause of Greek independence. She appreciated the opportunity to learn more about this period of history.

SHP assured the Ambassador that it will continue together with the Museum of Philhellenism, to promote with their work, the common cultural values ​​of Greece and Ireland, and the continuous philhellenism as a virtue, to serve the constant progress of our societies.